Six years and a vision

In the six years of social work with refugees, the hectic pace of everyday life swallowed up many expectations on my work. Injustices were endured in order to function and do justice to all tasks. During this time, I observed shortcomings that led me to weave my own utopia of this profession.

Foto: Anna Shvets via pexels

I have a dream.

The dream that the basic needs of all people (according to Henderson) living in our country are met. I mean both the physical needs for rest and sleep, proximity, suitable clothing, warmth and hygiene. As well as the need for security, for the articulation of personal feelings and opinions, for the living of religious conviction, for satisfying employment, for participation in cultural life and the satisfaction of a thirst for knowledge.

I have a dream.

The dream that support for refugees is based on needs, not on political sensitivities.

I have a dream.

The dream that the dignity of every human being in our country is inviolable and that state institutions respect and protect it.

I have a dream.

The dream that no one is discriminated against because of their origin, their ethnicity, their language, their homeland and origin, their faith, their religious or political views.

I have a dream.

The dream that all people are worth the same, because all people feel, hope, strive, and struggle every day. All want the best for their children, help their families and friends. All are born naked and after their death are measured by their deeds alone.

I have a dream.

The dream that politics takes a clear stand FOR the people who are newly arriving and thus sets the course for a humane administrative culture. The dream that “integration”, as we want to live it with each other, is finally defined, so that it can no longer be abused, but can be realized.

I have a dream.

The dream that we treat people who seek refuge in our country as guests, that we give them the feeling that they are welcome and can stay. Maybe also the understanding: we need you, instead of: we distrust you.

I have a dream.

The dream that in our country refugees are involved in decisions. To participate in decisions about accommodation, job search, etc. means to value them, to empower them, to enable them instead of patronizing them.

I have a dream.

The dream that there are spaces of encounter. Everywhere in the country. For old residents and new arrivals. For the exchange of knowledge about cultures, experiences about life and plans for the future. Exchange that creates the conditions for us to form an opinion about each other or to check our prejudices. Where encounters take place at eye level, we can meet as human beings: warmly, honestly and curiously.

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